Thursday, 26 June 2008

Going shopping

Sally has been itching for her independence lately (luckily involving things like helping with the chores or changing Charlie's nappy) and she's striving all the time for more. But I'm still terrified, each Tuesday, when she walks herself - alone - to her piano teacher's house. (I've only just stopped spying on her while she does it and only then due to the funny looks that I was getting. 'Oh it's alright, she's my daughter' I explained one afternoon, while watching from behind a hedge. 'That's what they all say' grumbled the old lady as she walked past, tutting. I then spent the remainder of the evening fearing imminent arrest!) So, laden with a bike, her school bag, my school bag, a lap-top and a shopping list from Sarah, I was rather pleased when she announced the other day that I could sit outside and wait for her while she went in and did the shopping. There's a bench outside the supermarket; she's a sensible young girl; she knows the layout of the shop. But as I waited, and I waited, and I waited, I tried hard to stem the rising tide of panic. What could she be doing in there? The list was only half-a-dozen items long? I went up to the window, straining past the posters advertising special offers, but I couldn't see her. Eventually, and after an eternity, I caught sight of her queuing at the till. I waved; she smiled. Evidently, everything was alright. 'Why were you so long?' I asked as nonchalantly as I could when she appeared with the shopping bags. 'Well I was working out that if you bought six froobes of yoghurt for £1, then you'd be better off to buy two packs because you'd then save 50p.' I didn't know your maths was that bad, Sal, I thought. But there was more. 'And if you bought six cartons then you got the same amount of yoghurt but for only £1.25. I've saved you seventy-five pee, daddy' Sally beamed, holding up the coins. I told her she could keep the change. It seemed a small price, really.

16 comments:

  1. I love this blog! Sally's growing up EXACTLY as a woman will - spending hours shopping. And your stalking rings a bell too - I've not done it but I have felt like it....

    Females will shop, old bean, and take hours doing so. Enjoy it!

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  2. In these credit crunch-y times, she clearly knows how to economise....good on her.

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  3. Hello! New to your blog - thanks for visiting mine. I know just what you mean about wanting your child to be independent but being racked with worry when they're out of sight. My boy's 6 and would go out exploring for the whole day if I let him.

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  4. You may as well get used to that terrified stomach-churning feeling when she's not actually in the house. It doesn't get any better!

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  5. You're right Eddie - I've just got to work out how to do it. And I'm as proud as she is of her eye for a bargain - very useful at the moment, as you say valley girl. Sally sounds more cautious than your six-year-old does, gonebacksouth, and I'm not sure if that's due to me (though as I child, and not much older than six, I was out all day. It didn't seem to matter). Whatever, she's now rightly wanting to do things without her daddy at a safe distance, and, yes motl, I'll just have to get used to it.

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  6. Oh yes us women have an eye for a bargain!

    Hope all goes well with the allergy testing.

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  7. aha - a soon to be ex-teacher -- well hooray to that...I am an ex-teacher. I saw the light and retrained as a homeopath after the kids...so much nicer dealing with eczema and menopausal women than a class full! JGYG

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  8. It gets worse, far worse. At least when they grow up and leave home you don't know how late they get in after a night out.

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  9. Yes, bless - she really is a love, Liz; I can't wait for the soon-to-be to become simply 'ex', yarn girl (although I still like teaching, in so many ways) - there's so much to look forward to! And yes, I know, it will get worse, z. It's only now you understand the kind of things your own parents must have gone through!

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  10. Better you stalking your daughter than someone else! Sweet story but I can attest to the fact that I was born without the shopping gene. Hate it!

    You daughter however, was quite correctly showing you how she can save money - money that when she is older will probably be spent on shoes and handbags!

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  11. True enough, mob. You're probably right about the shoes and handbags, although - to date - she's more a saver than a spender!

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  12. Dear Mr Dotterel, absolutely the worst feeling in the world is on entering your child's bedroom at, say, 8 am on a Sunday morning to find the bed unslept in and the child (aged 18, but hey) not home from the previous night. I cannot begin to describe the great wave, the tsunami, of panic that starts in the stomach and rises up to the throat. The yell of fear you produce is only equalled by the roar of rage/relief when the child appears at 10 am, yawning, saying "You look worried...What's the matter ... I stayed over at Lucy's ... I thought I'd told you ...my phone's got no battery." The last time this happened was 10 years ago, but I have never forgotten the feeling.

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  13. I guess I've got that coming, but I'm certainly not looking forward to it!

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  14. hello

    thanks for your very kind comments on my own blog. If you would like to have some personal contact, here is my email address:

    o.thello@onlinehome.de

    Se you soon
    Tonio

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  15. Oh you sound exactly like me. I imagine the worst scenarios....The hardest part is feigning the nonchalance so that your own kids don't think you are paranoid nutcase. (I'm not always successful at that!)

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